Sample Report

Here is a sample of the report you will receive at the end of   
                              your home inspection. 
Our report is changing all the time, improving every year:

 (The numbers you see are references into our book.  They indicate the chapter, section and paragraph.  For example, 1C.44 would indicate chapter 1, section C, paragraph 44.  This is all very clear once the book is received.  What follows is an actual inspection conducted in February 2008 - only the letterhead is missing. The report can be accompanied or followed by photos, particularly when the item photographed is unusual or the client is out of town and not present at the inspection.)


AND OF COURSE, EVEN THOUGH OUR BOOK CONTAINS OVER 1,000 PHOTOS AND DIAGRAMS, IF PHOTOS ARE NECESSARY TO DESCRIBE A PARTICULAR CONDITION THEY WILL BE ADDED DIRECTLY TO THE REPORT.


 

*Inspection Summary

Concerns and recommendations: Structure

 1C.44                       Beam: Span too great for the strength of structural member?  Exterior double beams on the front porch sagging already

 1C.41                       Cellulose debris (any wood product, such as mulch or wood piles) near house may attract termites

 1C.40                       Concrete, porous and improperly veneered – front porch stoop, into which the front porch stairs and posts are buried – topping other concrete in this manner requires a minimum of 5” to be effective – this “repair” will begin cracking inside of a few months and totally deteriorate over time

 1C.50                       Instability/ settling indicators & phenomena:    cracks in interior (7C.01, 1C.21, 1C.28); diagonal cracks in interior walls (1C.28, 7C.01); door jamb not square? (1C.28, 7C.02); floor uneven/ unlevel (1C.14); sag/ creep likely (1C.12); shrinkage/ seating of wood frame likely (1C.33);

 1C.39                       Double or triple joists recommended:  exterior joists of the ends of the front porch – the current joist is nailed into, but not tied into, the decking – the exterior joist for strength should be doubled up

 1C.38                       Joist-beam attachment inadequate?  Exterior joists on front porch, nailed in only

 1C.18                       Structure /foundation moisture indicators and phenomena:  none evident

 1C.06                       Wood:  termite tunnels seen in basement by removing ceiling tiles – located on the floor joists supporting the first floor – unknown if active, but insect damage suspected— call a licensed pest control agent

 1A.20                       Structure comparative rating: apparently fairly good

 1A.20                       Probable need for major repairs within 10 years: moderate – unprofessional work – increased risk and potential for future problems

            Note: Above opinions are based on visual clues; tests by specialists are recommended:  soils engineer--(for core samples?); landscape architect--for drainage; professional engineer with structural experience if there are any structural concerns;

  

`                                                                                  1

Concerns and recommendations: Exterior

 2C.03                       Guardrail: front porch, not level

 9B                            Caulking, exterior: Improve & maintain as needed – an annual homeowner inspection of caulked areas is needed – be sure to use the proper caulking recommended on the tube or in this book for any repair you wish to make

 1B.03                        Chimney liner spalling (unsafe?) – the flues are not plumb and there are concrete blocks on top of the chimney perhaps holding them in place – debris evidence in the fireplace and where the furnace connector tubing fits into the flue

 1B.16                        Chimney movement – at least the upper three feet of this chimney needs examination because of movement – it is likely that at least that much of the chimney and flue needs to be replaced. Evaluation by a specialist is recommended

 1B.04                       Chimney top is deteriorating:  no evidence of a solid mortar cap

 1B.02                       Spalling brick on chimney

 1C.07                       Deck: Wood splinters could be a safety hazard – wood decks should be treated regularly, not only for water proofing, but also UV protection – be sure to read the label and that the product you choose has all such protection

 9E                             Door loose, drafty (also see 7C.02) – side door, hinges loose, not installed properly in the jam

 7C.02                       Door not unlocking – upper level rear door – improperly installed and fitted into the jam – very unprofessional

 2C.06                       Flatwork, concrete: Drains toward house - driveway

 1C.24                       Flatwork, concrete: Settling driveway, severe cracking toward total failure

 2P                            Paint peeling

 2P                            Paint thin – front porch trim and wood work

 1C.16                       Deck: Stair stringer inadequately attached to deck ledger?  No attachment visible

 2C.17                       Stairs adequately sturdy?  Front porch stair stringers improperly cut, with interesting shims to attempt to make the stairs level and at an equivalent height

 2C.17                       Step tread depths differ more than 3/8" – front porch

 2C.08                       Vegetation on or near the house should be removed – it can introduce moisture and insects into the house, hold moisture against the structure or, if too large and too close, do damage to foundations, slabs and walls

 1D                            Grading/ drainage:  Improve and maintain . . .  be sure that any surface water or downspout discharge drains easily away from the house – a good rule of thumb for soil grading is a slope of 1” for every 4’ of run away from the house

 1C.57                       Moisture isolation improvement recommended:  concrete to cut end of wood – front porch stoop and stairs and posts – not professional

                                 Window screens (insect) missing and damaged

 2A.20                       Exterior comparative rating: apparently fairly good

            Amateur or unprofessional workmanship--increased risk;

  

 `                                                                               2

Concerns and recommendations: Roof and Related

 3C.06                       Downspout: Missing elbows, over front porch roof – should drain parallel to the roof

 3C.06                       Gutters: Loose or leaky joints - front

 3C.06                       Gutters: Low spots suspected – improperly inclined in front, high and low

 3C.06                       Leaves/ seeds in gutters should be cleaned regularly – where there are a lot of trees gutter caps are highly recommended

 3C.12                       Water concern/ evidence:  none evident

 3A.20                       Roof (not roof structure) comparative rating: apparently fairly good

  

 `

Concerns and recommendations:  Plumbing

 9B                             Caulking when needed around the shower/ tub should be 100% silicone with a fungicide – read the label to make sure it is good for bathroom applications

 4C.24                       Faucet drip – bathroom sink

 4C.24                       Handle broken – middle level shower

 4C.26                       Low flow from shower  because the diverter valve does not send all the water to the shower head – upper level

 4A.00                       Freeze-vulnerable piping (5C.79):  the exterior hose bibs may freeze as they run through the exterior wall – be sure to winterize as described in the book

 4C.01                       Leak, water (also see 4C.03):  interior front hose shut off, over the main valve

 6C.10                       Loose joints in vent exhaust pipe for water heater

 6C.10                        Vent may be full of rust and soot over water heater

 6C.10                        Vent may be inappropriate for water heater (also see 4A.12):  should not tie into the furnace vent, but installed directly into the chimney flue

 4A.20                       Plumbing comparative rating: apparently fair

            Amateur work: A licensed plumber should re-inspect and correct.

  

 `                                                                               3

Concerns and recommendations: Electrical

 5C.47                       Cable jacket cut back too short/ inappropriately stripped – servicing the lower level disposal

 5C.17                       Cable not attached to structure at 4 1/2' intervals – basement, over the ceiling tiles – exterior for cable installation

 5C.19                       Dedicated circuit recommended for basement refrigerator – should not be using one of the kitchen outlets, and certainly not GFI connected

 5C.67                       Labels recommended for all circuits in panel box

 5C.28                       Connector should be used for all cables entering boxes – no connector clamp used for either disposal

 5C.40                       GFCI protection often isn’t found in older houses.   Since this house was built before all or many of the GFI codes, an upgrade is recommended for:  all bathroom receptacles; all exterior receptacles;

 5C.40                       GFCI:  basement outlet behind the fridge is covered by the other one so this GFI outlet is superfluous

 5C.42                       Grounding electrode conductor not connected and wrapped inappropriately – basement disposal

 5C.52                       Receptacle grounding: missing - kitchen

 5C.77                       Light not working?  Basement kitchen

 5C.57                       Limbs /tree might damage conductors

 5C.65                       Receptacle reversed polarity-check all receptacles – various throughout the house – indicative of unprofessional wiring

 5C.59                       Receptacle broken – middle level, covered with tape

 5C.59                       Receptacle dead – basement light

 5C.64                       Receptacles: painted – various – all such painted receptacles need to be replaced as potential fire hazards

 5C.46                       Receptacle, dryer:  in newer homes 4-prong instead of 3 now is the standard

 5C.67                       Service underpowered for a house of this size?  Only 150 amps, divided throughout the house – very minimal for modern electrical usage

 5C.72                       Tap, multiple: Two or more wires in lug that was designed for one (panel box connection)

 5E                             Circuit, 120-V, resistance is excessive when the voltage drop exceeds 13% or if there is impedance of at least 1.1 Ohms – if today’s inspection reveals such high figures, then give article 5E to an electrician prior to any repair – today no outlets registered over10 %, and therefore are fine

 5C.24                       Exposed wiring could suffer mechanical damage – servicing the kitchen exhaust fan

 5A.40                       Electrical comparative rating: apparently fair

            Professional? Electrician should re-inspect and correct amateur work;

  

 `                                                                               4

Concerns and recommendations: Heating and Air  
      Conditioning

 6W                           Creosote excessive in chimney?  The fireplace and flue need cleaning and an inspection of the upper flue is needed to assess any damage present – all prior to the next fire-burning season – often damage to the upper flue is not visible from below and can require expensive repairs – mortar deterioration needs repair

 6C.21                       Working clearance for central A.C. system should be at least 30" in front of the unit

 6C.21                       Working clearance for central heating system should be at least 30" in front of the unit – or as deep as the unit is

 6C.23                       Outdoor unit clearance provides inadequate ventilation?  Under front porch

 6C.22                       Outdoor unit support attention recommended:  less than 3" to soil – this unit likely does not work

 6C.01                       Filter – an electrostatic filter is highly recommended upon replacement – the filter should be replaced or cleaned regularly – 1-800-ALLERGY can be called to order permanent replacement filters – mention Paul Harvey for a discount

 2C.23                       Fireplace: moisture evidence - chimney allows rain to enter? see 6C.19 - due to chimney cap? see 1B.04 – metal chimney cap recommended

 6A.40                       Central A.C., comparative rating: unknown 6H outdoors under 65F, electric A.C. not tested;

 6A.40                       Heat, comparative rating: unknown: system shut down or not working

 6E       Carbon monoxide detector recommended

  

 `

Concerns and recommendations: Interior

 7C.18                       Wood floor cosmetic problems – not sanded properly and only one finish coat applied

 7C.01                       Cracks in ceiling/ wall are typical of drywall in a wood-frame house

 7C.01                       Cracks, typical of plaster

 8C.04                       Ceramic floor tiles not firmly attached – various cracked tiles are present in both the kitchen and master bathroom

 7C.17                       Stuck/ binding windows – all windows must function easily for fire code reasons

 7C.17                       Window broken on the side of the house

 7C.17                       Loose, drafty windows – various window locks broken or not working properly

 7A.20                       Interior comparative rating: apparently fair

            Unprofessional or amateur workmanship--may increase risk.

  

 `

Concerns and recommendations: Kitchen, Bath,  Utility, Insulation, Ventilation, etc.

 8C.07                       Dishwasher attention recommended:   not getting water

 9E.20                       Insulation comparative rating: poor

 3C.33                       Vent, gable: Insect screen recommended

 3C.17                       Ventilation inadequate in ceiling-to-roof area?  Small gable vents not enough

 1C.03                       Condensation/ excess humidity/ indoor air quality concerns (see 9D & 9H):   none evident

            Radon tests recommended (every house has some radon; see 9R).

            Water, soil, and air: Environmental tests recommended (see 9H).

 9D.20                       Ventilation comparative rating: apparently poor

 `                                                                                   5


*Part 1:  Analysis of the House

Introduction

This report was conducted to comply with the terms of a signed contract and is for the sole use of Roscoe and Lulabell Homebuyer, whose signature(s) appear on the contract, hereafter referred to as "Customer(s)." Did the Customer(s) attend this home survey? Yes.

 

The inspector's obligations extend exclusively to the Customer(s) whose signature(s) appear on the signed Contract. The inspector unequivocally denies any responsibility to third parties that have not signed the Contract. NO obligations to the home inspector's customer can transfer or extend to person(s) or entities other than those with signatures on the Contract.

 

Please see important information just above the lines that read "End of Part 1", and "End of Report." Also see report cover.

Underlined references refer to in-depth explanations found in the Customer's book. See Book’s Preface. Customers should study each reference (checkmark each as you read, starting with those in Part 2 first). You can get the latest version of articles referenced in this report from www.homexam.com.

Items listed in the "Concerns" sections are deficiencies that, ideally, should be re-inspected and corrected by a specialist. The specialist should consider the listed deficiencies as possible tell-tale signs of greater problems that were not reported in this report.  All concerns should be viewed as possible or actual material defects (defects that significantly affect value, desirability, habitability, or safety).  Any items identified with bold print should be viewed as dangerous, of immediate concern and potentially expensive to correct or repair.  Remember, this is a visual inspection and is limited to visual observations of apparent condition existing at the time of the inspection only.  The inspector does not take equipment apart.  No equipment or system will be dismantled during the inspection and no pilot lights will be lit.

An “unseen dangers” specialist should be able to find unseen dangers in this property. However, the author of this report was not retained to do so and issues no opinion on these unseen dangers.

Dollar figures for repair and upgrade costs, if included in this report, are approximations, not estimates. Please get estimates from local contractors.

                                                                                     6

`

*Part 1 (A): STRUCTURE

 Factors that limited the thoroughness of this cursory examination of the structure:  typical (wall and some other structures were mostly hidden, could not be fully assessed); attic not explored, insulation too deep for safety; carpet or flooring covered the slab—could not examine slab for cracks  (most slabs are cracked)

 Good Features of this Structure

            Rot- and insect-resistant walls

 Concerns: Structure

 1C.44                       Beam: Span too great for the strength of structural member?  Exterior double beams on the front porch sagging already

 1C.41                       Cellulose debris (any wood product, such as mulch or wood piles) near house may attract termites

 1C.40                       Concrete, porous and improperly veneered – front porch stoop, into which the front porch stairs and posts are buried – topping other concrete in this manner requires a minimum of 5” to be effective – this “repair” will begin cracking inside of a few months and totally deteriorate over time

 1C.50                       Instability/ settling indicators & phenomena:    cracks in interior (7C.01, 1C.21, 1C.28); diagonal cracks in interior walls (1C.28, 7C.01); door jamb not square? (1C.28, 7C.02); floor uneven/ unlevel (1C.14); sag/ creep likely (1C.12); shrinkage/ seating of wood frame likely (1C.33);

 1C.39                       Double or triple joists recommended:  exterior joists of the ends of the front porch – the current joist is nailed into, but not tied into, the decking – the exterior joist for strength should be doubled up

 1C.38                       Joist-beam attachment inadequate?  Exterior joists on front porch, nailed in only

 1C.18                       Structure /foundation moisture indicators and phenomena:  none evident

 1C.06                       Wood:  termite tunnels seen in basement by removing ceiling tiles – located on the floor joists supporting the first floor – unknown if active, but insect damage suspected— call a licensed pest control agent

 1A.20                       Structure comparative rating: apparently fairly good

 1A.20                       Probable need for major repairs within 10 years: moderate – unprofessional work – increased risk and potential for future problems

            Note: Above opinions are based on visual clues; tests by specialists are recommended:  soils engineer--(for core samples?); landscape architect--for drainage; professional engineer with structural experience if there are any structural concerns;

  

 `                                                                                7

`

*Part 1 (B): EXTERIOR, INCLUDING DOORS & WINDOWS

 Factors that limited the thoroughness of this cursory examination of the exterior:  typical (siding is not removed for inspection, etc.); window screens are not assessed;

 Good Features of the Exterior

 Concerns: Exterior

 2C.03                       Guardrail: front porch, not level

 9B       Caulking, exterior: Improve & maintain as needed – an annual homeowner inspection of caulked areas is needed – be sure to use the proper caulking recommended on the tube or in this book for any repair you wish to make

 1B.03 Chimney liner spalling (unsafe?) – the flues are not plumb and there are concrete blocks on top of the chimney perhaps holding them in place – debris evidence in the fireplace and where the furnace connector tubing fits into the flue

 1B.16 Chimney movement – at least the upper three feet of this chimney needs examination because of movement – it is likely that at least that much of the chimney and flue needs to be replaced. Evaluation by a specialist is recommended

 1B.04 Chimney top is deteriorating:  no evidence of a solid mortar cap

 1B.02 Spalling brick on chimney

 1C.07                       Deck: Wood splinters could be a safety hazard – wood decks should be treated regularly, not only for water proofing, but also UV protection – be sure to read the label and that the product you choose has all such protection

 9E       Door loose, drafty (also see 7C.02) – side door, hinges loose, not installed properly in the jam

 7C.02                       Door not unlocking – upper level rear door – improperly installed and fitted into the jam – very unprofessional

 2C.06                       Flatwork, concrete: Drains toward house - driveway

 1C.24                       Flatwork, concrete: Settling driveway, severe cracking toward total failure

 2P       Paint peeling

 2P       Paint thin – front porch trim and wood work

 1C.16                       Deck: Stair stringer inadequately attached to deck ledger?  No attachment visible

 2C.17                       Stairs adequately sturdy?  Front porch stair stringers improperly cut, with interesting shims to attempt to make the stairs level and at an equivalent height

 2C.17                       Step tread depths differ more than 3/8" – front porch

 2C.08                       Vegetation on or near the house should be removed – it can introduce moisture and insects into the house, hold moisture against the structure or, if too large and too close, do damage to foundations, slabs and walls

 1D      Grading/ drainage:  Improve and maintain . . .  be sure that any surface water or downspout discharge drains easily away from the house – a good rule of thumb for soil grading is a slope of 1” for every 4’ of run away from the house

 1C.57                       Moisture isolation improvement recommended:  concrete to cut end of wood – front porch stoop and stairs and posts – not professional

            Window screens (insect) missing and damaged

 2A.20                       Exterior comparative rating: apparently fairly good

            Amateur or unprofessional workmanship--increased risk;

  

 `                                                                             8

`

*Part 1 (C): ROOF AND RELATED ITEMS

 Factors that limited the thoroughness of this cursory examination of the roof:  typical (some leaks only appear when wind blows from a certain direction, etc.); attic not fully explored – insulation too deep for safety;

 Good Features of Roof

            Apparently no abnormal condensation /leaks

 Concerns: Roof and Related

 3C.06                       Downspout: Missing elbows, over front porch roof – should drain parallel to the roof

 3C.06                       Gutters: Loose or leaky joints - front

 3C.06                       Gutters: Low spots suspected – improperly inclined in front, high and low

 3C.06                       Leaves/ seeds in gutters should be cleaned regularly – where there are a lot of trees gutter caps are highly recommended

 3C.12                       Water concern/ evidence:  none evident

 3A.20                       Roof (not roof structure) comparative rating: apparently fairly good

  

 `

`

*Part 1 (D): PLUMBING

 Factors that limited the thoroughness of this cursory plumbing examination:  typical (pipes hidden in walls, under soil, etc. obviously are not inspected);

 Good Features of the Plumbing System

 4A.10                       Functional drainage: good

 4A.09                       Functional flow: good

 Concerns: Plumbing

 9B                             Caulking when needed around the shower/ tub should be 100% silicone with a fungicide – read the label to make sure it is good for bathroom applications

 4C.24                       Faucet drip – bathroom sink

 4C.24                       Handle broken – middle level shower

 4C.26                       Low flow from shower  because the diverter valve does not send all the water to the shower head – upper level

 4A.00                       Freeze-vulnerable piping (5C.79):  the exterior hose bibs may freeze as they run through the exterior wall – be sure to winterize as described in the book

 4C.01                       Leak, water (also see 4C.03):  interior front hose shut off, over the main valve

 6C.10                       Loose joints in vent exhaust pipe for water heater

 6C.10                        Vent may be full of rust and soot over water heater

 6C.10                        Vent may be inappropriate for water heater (also see 4A.12):  should not tie into the furnace vent, but installed directly into the chimney flue

 4A.20                       Plumbing comparative rating: apparently fair

            Amateur work: A licensed plumber should re-inspect and correct.

  

 `                                                                               9

`

*Part 1 (E) ELECTRICAL

 Factors that limited the thoroughness of this cursory electrical examination:  typical (hidden wires in walls, etc. obviously were not inspected);

 Good Features of the Electrical System

            Disconnect box condition: good

 5C.67                       Disconnect box access and light: good

 Concerns: Electrical

 5C.47                       Cable jacket cut back too short/ inappropriately stripped – servicing the lower level disposal

 5C.17                       Cable not attached to structure at 4 1/2' intervals – basement, over the ceiling tiles – exterior for cable installation

 5C.19                       Dedicated circuit recommended for basement refrigerator – should not be using one of the kitchen outlets, and certainly not GFI connected

 5C.67                       Labels recommended for all circuits in panel box

 5C.28                       Connector should be used for all cables entering boxes – no connector clamp used for either disposal

 5C.40                       GFCI protection often isn’t found in older houses.   Since this house was built before all or many of the GFI codes, an upgrade is recommended for:  all bathroom receptacles; all exterior receptacles;

 5C.40                       GFCI:  basement outlet behind the fridge is covered by the other one so this GFI outlet is superfluous

 5C.42                       Grounding electrode conductor not connected and wrapped inappropriately – basement disposal

 5C.52                       Receptacle grounding: missing - kitchen

 5C.77                       Light not working?  Basement kitchen

 5C.57                       Limbs /tree might damage conductors

 5C.65                       Receptacle reversed polarity-check all receptacles – various throughout the house – indicative of unprofessional wiring

 5C.59                       Receptacle broken – middle level, covered with tape

 5C.59                       Receptacle dead – basement light

 5C.64                       Receptacles: painted – various – all such painted receptacles need to be replaced as potential fire hazards

 5C.46                       Receptacle, dryer:  in newer homes 4-prong instead of 3 now is the standard

 5C.67                       Service underpowered for a house of this size?  Only 150 amps, divided throughout the house – very minimal for modern electrical usage

 5C.72                       Tap, multiple: Two or more wires in lug that was designed for one (panel box connection)

 5E                            Circuit, 120-V, resistance is excessive when the voltage drop exceeds 13% or if there is impedance of at least 1.1 Ohms – if today’s inspection reveals such high figures, then give article 5E to an electrician prior to any repair – today no outlets registered over10 %, and therefore are fine

 5C.24                       Exposed wiring could suffer mechanical damage – servicing the kitchen exhaust fan

 5A.40                       Electrical comparative rating: apparently fair

            Professional? Electrician should re-inspect and correct amateur work;

  

 `                                                                               10

`

*Part 1 (F): Heating, ventilation, and Cooling (HVAC)

 Factors that limited the thoroughness of this cursory HVAC examination: typical (equipment not disassembled to view the inside and no pilot lights are lit, etc.); fuel not available – heating system not evaluated; too cool outdoors to fully assess the cooling system – escrow needs to assure that this system functions;

 Good Features of HVAC Systems

 6A.21                       Apparently adequate clearances to combustibles

            Central A.C. source apparently provided for each habitable room

 6W     Fireplace apparently vented adequately if chimney is fully lined as (perhaps) is necessary

            Heat. source apparently provided for each habitable room

 6A.09                       Heating system: Apparently vented/ventilated properly

 Concerns: Heating and Air Conditioning

 6W     Creosote excessive in chimney?  The fireplace and flue need cleaning and an inspection of the upper flue is needed to assess any damage present – all prior to the next fire-burning season – often damage to the upper flue is not visible from below and can require expensive repairs – mortar deterioration needs repair

 6C.21                       Working clearance for central A.C. system should be at least 30" in front of the unit

 6C.21                       Working clearance for central heating system should be at least 30" in front of the unit – or as deep as the unit is

 6C.23                       Outdoor unit clearance provides inadequate ventilation?  Under front porch

 6C.22                       Outdoor unit support attention recommended:  less than 3" to soil – this unit likely does not work

 6C.01                       Filter – an electrostatic filter is highly recommended upon replacement – the filter should be replaced or cleaned regularly – 1-800-ALLERGY can be called to order permanent replacement filters – mention Paul Harvey for a discount

 2C.23                       Fireplace: moisture evidence - chimney allows rain to enter? see 6C.19 - due to chimney cap? see 1B.04 – metal chimney cap recommended

 6A.40                       Central A.C., comparative rating: unknown 6H outdoors under 65F, electric A.C. not tested;

 6A.40                       Heat, comparative rating: unknown: system shut down or not working

 6E       Carbon monoxide detector recommended

  

 `

`

 

*Part 1 (G): INTERIOR, INCLUDING DOORS AND WINDOWS

 Factors that limited the thoroughness of this cursory examination of the interior: typical; safety glass that was identified by the factory with paper stickers often cannot be distinguished from ordinary glass

 Good Features of the Interior

 7C.17                       Thermal insulating glass in primary windows (some faulty seals may not have been found during this cursory survey) – very old windows

 7C.18                       Wood floors

            Water penetration (other than any perhaps noted below):  none seen

 Concerns: Interior

 7C.18                       Wood floor cosmetic problems – not sanded properly and only one finish coat applied

 7C.01                       Cracks in ceiling/ wall are typical of drywall in a wood-frame house

 7C.01                       Cracks, typical of plaster

 8C.04                       Ceramic floor tiles not firmly attached – various cracked tiles are present in both the kitchen and master bathroom

 7C.17                       Stuck/ binding windows – all windows must function easily for fire code reasons

 7C.17                       Window broken on the side of the house

 7C.17                       Loose, drafty windows – various window locks broken or not working properly

 7A.20                       Interior comparative rating: apparently fair

            Unprofessional or amateur workmanship--may increase risk.

  

 `                                                                             11

`

 

*Part 1 (H): KITCHEN, BATH, UTILITY, INSULATION, VENTILATION

 Factors that limited the thoroughness of this cursory examination: typical (appliances not disassembled, and some aspects such as timers are not thoroughly tested, floors are not opened under showers, etc.);

 Good Features: Kitchen, Bath, Utility, Insulation, Ventilation, etc.

 8A.00                       Ceramic tile

 9D      Ventilation between ceiling and roof includes: gable vent; natural ventilation;

 1C.03                       No condensation/ excess humidity evidence seen (see 9D & 9H);

 Concerns: Kitchen, Bath, Utility, Insulation, Ventilation, etc.

 8C.07                       Dishwasher attention recommended:   not getting water

 9E.20                        Insulation comparative rating: poor

 3C.33                       Vent, gable: Insect screen recommended

 3C.17                       Ventilation inadequate in ceiling-to-roof area?  Small gable vents not enough

 1C.03                       Condensation/ excess humidity/ indoor air quality concerns (see 9D & 9H):   none evident

            Radon tests recommended (every house has some radon; see 9R).

            Water, soil, and air: Environmental tests recommended (see 9H).

 9D.20                       Ventilation comparative rating: apparently poor

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*Ratings ("Good, Fair, Poor, Apparently Operational") for this cursory (screening) survey: These ratings compare the general condition to others of similar type and age. Ratings depend mainly on visual clues and are based on apparent functioning as observed on the day of the inspection. Prudent budget for problems NOT found by this survey: $400. For maximum risk reduction, all flaws, concerns, and problems listed on this report or verbally communicated should be corrected by specialists who should presume EACH to be a telltale indicator of unreported problems. Specialists should assess scope and extent of each. For maximum risk reduction, specialists also should re-examine incompletely inspected systems (all those noted above as having significant cursory examination limitations

 

=========END OF PART 1 =========


12

 

*Part 2:  Systems and Components of the House

 

 COMPONENTS AND SYSTEMS LISTED BELOW WERE EXAMINED AND RATED "APPARENTLY OPERATIONAL" EXCEPT AS NOTED IN PART 1 AND HEREIN. "APPARENTLY OPERATIONAL" MEANS THESE ITEMS ARE SHOWING WEAR AND TEAR THAT IS TYPICAL OF OTHER HOUSES OF SIMILAR AGE AND CONSTRUCTION.

 *Part 2 (A): STRUCTURE

 1G.00                       HOUSE AGE (APPROXIMATE YEARS):   67 AS REPORTED BY REAL ESTATE AGENT OR LISTING INFORMATION;

 1A.00, 1A.01, 1G.00 PREDOMINANT FOUNDATION TYPE: BASEMENT STYLE;

 1G.15                       PREDOMINANT FOUNDATION ANCHORS (ALSO SEE 1C.04): NOT OBSERVED.

 1A.03                       PREDOMINANT FOUNDATION MATERIALS: MASONRY UNIT, HOLLOW CORE;

 1G.01                       PREDOMINANT WALL STRUCTURE TYPE: FRAME, PRESUMABLY WOOD;

 1G.03                       PREDOMINANT FLOOR STRUCTURE: WOOD (CONVENTIONAL LUMBER WITH WOOD/WOOD-PRODUCT SUBFLOOR); CONCRETE SLAB;

 1G.04                       PREDOMINANT CEILING STRUCTURE: WOOD (CONVENTIONAL DIMENSIONAL LUMBER);

 1G.04                       PREDOMINANT ROOF STRUCTURE: CONVENTIONAL JOIST/RAFTER SYSTEM; WOOD TRUSSES;  PLYWOOD SHEATHING (BETTER THAN OSB/WAFERBOARD SHEATHING);

 1A.02                       ALTERED/ EXPANDED: BASEMENT FINISH – WAS A PERMIT PULLED TO DO THIS WORK?  YOU WOULD WANT TO ASK THE SELLER FOR ANY PERMITS FOR ANY WORK COMPLETED.  WAS A FINAL INSPECTION RENDERED?

 ALSO: 1G.13 DECK; 1G.14 GIRDER: STEEL; 1C.58 LARGE HOUSE; 1C.58 OLDER HOUSE; 1G.13 PORCH;

 LEVELS OR STORIES (FLOORS): 3

 1S       SITE: 1S.06 BELOW STREET-LEVEL; 1S.02 HILL OVERLOOKING; 1S.02 HILLSIDE; 1S.16 SIDEWALKS FOUND;

 A THOROUGH WOOD-INSECT INSPECTION IS RECOMMENDED.

 *Part 2 (B): EXTERIOR

 2A.00, 2A.02 PREDOMINANT WALL CLADDING MATERIALS: BRICK, SOLID;

 ALSO: EAVES; SOFFITS; FASCIAS (OBSERVED FROM GROUND LEVEL); FLASHING; TRIM; ENTRY DOORS; A REPRESENTATIVE SAMPLE OF WINDOWS; VEGETATION, GRADING, DRAINAGE;

 *Part 2 (C): ROOF AND RELATED

 3A.00                       WEATHER WHEN INSPECTED: CLEAR, ABOUT (DEGREES F):   45

 PREDOMINANT TYPE & MATERIALS: 3A.01 GABLE, 3A.02 ASPHALT SHINGLES;

 ALSO: ACCESS OPENING AND ACCESSIBILITY; DRAINAGE SYSTEM; FLASHINGS; PENETRATIONS;

 ROOF ASSESSED BY OBSERVING THE FOLLOWING:  EXTERIOR FROM GROUND LEVEL; EXTERIOR FROM WINDOW NEAR ROOF; UNDERSIDE FROM ATTIC ACCESS OPENING;

                            13


 *Part 2 (D): PLUMBING

 4A.00, 4A.01 WATER SERVICE PIPING: COPPER;

 4A.02                       PREDOMINANT INTERIOR WATER SUPPLY AND DISTRIBUTION PIPING: COPPER;

 4A.03                       PREDOMINANT INTERIOR DRAIN, WASTE & VENT PIPING: PLASTIC;  CAST IRON; COPPER, TYPE DWV (YELLOW LABEL);

 4A.05                       MAIN WATER CUT-OFF VALVE (NOT TESTED) LOCATED: IN BASEMENT.

 4A.06                       PROBABLE WATER SUPPLY: PUBLIC.

 4A.07                       PROBABLE SEWAGE SYSTEM: PUBLIC.

 4A.08                       ANY "S" TRAPS? NONE SEEN.

 4A.12                       WATER HEATER (INCL. OPERATING & SAFETY CONTROLS): NATURAL GAS (CHIMNEY, VENTILATION /VENTING /CLEARANCE TO COMBUSTIBLES), ABOUT 50-GAL.

 ALSO: SUPPORTS; FIXTURES; FAUCETS; 4A.00 HOSE BIB DRY OR SHUT OFF, NOT INSPECTED;

 *Part 2 (E): ELECTRICAL

 5A.00 SERVICE: 150-AMP,

 5A.01                       120/240-VOLT;

 5W     SERVICE CONDUCTORS/CABLES: OVERHEAD ALUMINUM;

 5A.02                       MAIN DISCONNECT LOCATION: IN DISTRIBUTION BOX. BASEMEN COMPOSED OF BREAKER;

  (5A.00                     DISTRIBUTION PANEL, INCL. COMPONENTS INSIDE THE BOX: SINGLE-BUS BREAKER BOX FOUND.

 DISTRIBUTION CONDUCTOR MATERIAL: 5W ALUMINUM & COPPER MAJOR APPLIANCE CIRCUITS;

 5A.05                       GROUND WIRE CONNECTED TO: UNKNOWN (NOT FOUND).

 ALSO  (REPRESENTATIVE SAMPLES OF LIGHTING FIXTURES, RECEPTACLES/SWITCHES WERE TESTED): 5A.08 GROUNDING-TYPE (3-HOLE) RECEPTACLES; 5A.08 NONGROUNDING-TYPE (2-HOLE) RECEPTACLES; 5A.12 GFCI PROTECTION;

 RECOMMENDED: 5A.12 ADDITIONAL GFCI PROTECTION (UPDATE TO CURRENT STANDARDS); 6E CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTORS; 5A.20 SMOKE DETECTORS CONNECTED SO ALL WILL SOUND SIMULTANEOUSLY. 5A.20 SMOKE DETECTOR FOR EACH BEDROOM. 5A.20 SMOKE DETECTOR FOR EACH FLOOR.

 *Part 2 (F): HEAT, VENTILATION, & AIR CONDITIONING (HVAC)

 6A.00                       HEAT (UNIFORMITY/HEAT OUTPUT ADEQUACY NOT ASSESSED): 6W FIREPLACE, MASONRY— DRAFT CHARACTERISTICS NOT ASSESSED; FIREBOX, HEARTH AND EXTENSIONS, DAMPER, CHIMNEY AND FLUE (BUT NOT MANTLE OR FLUE INTERIOR), AND PERMANENTLY INSTALLED ACCESSORIES, WERE INSPECTED; GASKETS/ SEALS NOT INSPECTED; 6A.09 NATURAL GAS-FUELED 6A.05 FURNACE, LOW-VELOCITY (6A.19 APPROPRIATE) FORCED-AIR incl. BLOWER; FILTER; DUCTS; SUPPORTS; REGISTERS; DAMPERS;

 ALSO RELATED TO HEATING: CHIMNEY AND FLUE (INSPECTED AS VISIBLE FROM EXTERIOR VANTAGE POINTS); FUEL LINES MADE OF BLACK PIPE WERE FOUND;

 6H      CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONER (COOLING ADEQUACY AND UNIFORMITY NOT ASSESSED): ELECTRIC FUELED

 ALSO RELATED TO COOLING: LOW-PRESSURE FORCED AIR (6A.19 APPROPRIATE); AIR HANDLER; BLOWER; INSULATION; SUPPORTS; PIPES; FILTERS; DUCTS; REGISTERS; DAMPERS; INSULATION;

                             14

 *Part 2 (G): INTERIOR

 7A.00                       DOORS--NOT ALL ASSESSED; WINDOWS--NOT ALL ASSESSED; NOR STUCK UPPER SASHES OR WEAK SASH SPRINGS, IF ANY.

 7A.03                       FLOOR SURFACE MATERIALS INCLUDE: WOOD (SEE 7C.18); CERAMIC TILE (SEE 8C.04); CONCRETE; VINYL SHEET GOODS (SEE 7C.16); VINYL TILES (SEE 7C.16);

 7A.03                       PREDOMINANT WALL/CEILING MATERIALS: PLASTERBOARD, PROBABLY GYPSUM; PLASTER;

 7A.02                       PRIMARY WINDOWS: SINGLE-HUNG SASH;

 9H      RECOMMENDATION: GET ENVIRONMENTAL TESTING THAT MEETS ASTM STANDARDS

 *Part 2 (H): KITCHEN, BATH, UTILITY, VENTILATION, INSULATION

 9E.01 INSULATION OF UNFINISHED AREAS: MINERAL WOOL ABOVE CEILING;

 9D      VENTING/VAPOR incl. KIT/BATH/LAUNDRY/ANY CRAWL SPACES (9H); EXHAUST FAN: IN KITCHEN;

 8A.00                       COUNTERS AND A REPRESENTATIVE NUMBER OF CABINETS WERE INSPECTED;

 8A.01                       APPLIANCES WERE NOT FULLY INSPECTED, AND TIMERS/ THERMOSTATS/ ACCESSORIES, ETC. WERE UNTESTED. 9E AIR-TO-AIR HEAT EXCHANGER; CLOCK (ON OVEN); DISHWASHER; DISPOSAL; DRYER— ELECTRIC; RANGE— GAS; REFRIGERATOR; WASHING MACHINE;

 

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Give this report and relevant book articles to repair persons. A modified report perhaps may be mailed within 2 working days.

Typical maintenance costs: 1% of selling cost, each year.

This report is valid when the inspector has signed below and at the end of Part 1.

=======END OF REPORT =======

                                                               15
Jay performs inspections Monday through Saturday, throughout Northern Virginia, from his office in Bristow to Leesburg and Centreville, to Great Falls and Vienna and everywhere in between!